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Posts for category: Pediatric Care

By Clinical Pediatric Associates of North Texas
March 06, 2018
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Potty Training  
Saying goodbye to diapers is one of the milestones that parents look forward to the most. Kids are also generally excited about wearing “big kid underwear,” as well. Typically, most children will show signs of readiness between 18 and 24 months—but it can differ from child to child.  

How do I know When my Child is Ready?

It is important to understand when your child is ready to begin potty training. According to your pediatrician, your child may be ready for potty training if they:
  • Knows words for urine, stool and toilet
  • Is somewhat bothered by feeling wet or soiled
  • Shows interest in using the potty 
  • Has an awareness of when they are about to urinate or have a bowel movement

Are You Ready?

While it is important to know when your child is ready, your pediatrician also explains that it is also important for you to be prepared, as well. Potty training is not easy, and it does take a lot of energy and patience. It requires countless bathroom visits, and even extra laundry and puddle cleaning. If you or your spouse are up for it, go for it, but it is important to be patient and ready to help your child each step of the way—don’t get discouraged. 

Explore Different Strategies

When it comes to potty training, there are many strategies you can try. If you need help creating a proper strategy, talk to your pediatrician for suggestions. Here are a few commonly used by parents:
  • The hugs-and-kisses approach – give your child praise every time they use the potty correctly.  
  • The cold-turkey underwear approach – let your child pick out several pairs of “fun” underwear to make them feel special and go from there.
  • The get-with-the-program approach – dedicate time to promoting potty use for your child. Stay home and gently steer your toddler to the bathroom at predictable points throughout the day.
  • The sticker-chart approach – this is a fun way to encourage your child to begin potty training. Each time they use the potty, they get a sticker. 
Each child is different, so make sure you tailor your approach to best mean your child’s individual needs. While one approach may work for one child, another approach might be better for your other child. Talk to your pediatrician for more information on potty training and to learn more about other approaches you might want to tackle. 
By Clinical Pediatric Associates of North Texas
October 04, 2017
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Puberty  
Everyone goes through puberty, but everyone reacts differently to the hormonal changes. Typically, puberty begins in every person some time after the age of eight. This 
is the transition from childhood into an adulthood, when the sex organs grow and develop, and the body becomes capable to reproduce. These changes can make your child feel proud and happy, but they can also cause your child to feel confused or embarrassed—each feeling is completely normal.   
 
As a parent, it is important to help your child understand puberty and how to help him or her get through their hormonal changes. At your child’s pediatrician office, we want your child to have the best experience possible during puberty. To gain important knowledge and a better understanding of puberty for your child, your pediatrician is available. 
 
Hormonal changes cause a child’s sexual and physical characteristics to mature during puberty. In girls, the ovaries begin to increase production of estrogen and other female hormones. In boys, the testicles increase production of testosterone. The adrenal glands also produce hormones that cause increased armpit sweating, body odor, acne and armpit and pubic hair.  
 
By visiting your child’s pediatrician, you can better understand what to expect during puberty. From an increase in height to acne and sexual development, visiting your child’s pediatrician is important during puberty. 
By Clinical Pediatric Associates of North Texas
September 08, 2017
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Baby Care   Nail Care   Infants  

 

When it comes to caring for your baby, nail care is often overlooked. In the first few months of life, you may not be too worried about caring for your baby’s nails. But at some point your little one will take a swipe at you, and you will quickly find out how sharp those nails are. Baby nail care is easy—for the most part. Your pediatrician is available to offer helpful tips to ensure proper care for your baby’s nails.

Proper nail care can be as simple as trimming the nails when they get long enough to scratch you. However, your baby may squirm and move around, which makes cutting his or her nails difficult. Your pediatrician, we want the process of cutting your baby’s nails to be as easy as possible, which is why we are available to offer friendly advice.

There is no wrong way to cut your baby’s nails, as long as you do not nick the baby, and the nails get trimmed. Your pediatrician shares some basic tips:

  • Clean your baby’s hands, feet and nails during regular bathing.
  • Hold your baby’s finger and palm steady with one hand and trim with the other.
  • Press down on the fleshy pad of his or her fingertip to move the skin away from the nail.
  • Cut along the shape of the nail and snip any sharp corners or use an emery board.

While these tips may be easy to follow, some parents may still remain concerned about cutting their baby’s nails. If you are still concerned, follow these tips to make the job easier:

  • Have your partner hold the baby while you trim the nails.
  • Do it while your baby is sleeping.
  • Use only baby nail clippers to trim the nails.
  • Wait until your baby is in a good mood and find something to distract him or her, such as a new video, toy or snack.


Visit your pediatrician for more information on how to care for your baby, including proper nail care.

By Clinical Pediatric Associates of North Texas
March 15, 2017
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Scrapes   Minor Cuts  

Treating a CutA child’s job is to explore every nook and cranny of their world, but that can often lead way to injury. From split lips to skinned knees, scrapes and cuts are rites of passage for our children. As parents you can take all the precautions possible, but “boo-boos” will happen. However, if you understand the basics for treating cuts and scrapes, you and your child can make it through an episode with a minimum of tears.

When a cut or scrape occurs, your pediatrician offers these helpful tips:

  • Stop any bleeding. A minor scrape will stop bleeding on its own, but a cut or gash may not.  Using a clean washcloth or towel, apply gentle but direct pressure to the wound until the bleeding stops. 
  • Double up. If the blood soaks through the cloth, place another layer over it and continue to apply pressure. Elevating the injured body part can also help to slow the bleeding.
  • Rinse it off. Hold the injured body part under warm running water to wash away any dirt, broken glass, or any other foreign matter. 
  • Clean it up. If the skin around the cut is dirty, gently wash it with mild soap.
  • Break out the bandages. Once the bleeding has stopped and the wound is clean, dab on a thin layer of antibiotic ointment and apply a fresh bandage. Little kids usually enjoy choosing from a selection of cute and colorful bandages—so let your little one choose which one he or she wants.
  • Keep it clean. Change the bandage at least once a day or if it gets dirty. When a scab begins to form, you can remove the bandage, but be sure to teach your child not to pick at it.

If you are unsure how to handle your child’s injury, or if the cut does not stop bleeding, contact your pediatrician for more information.

It is almost impossible for a curious and active child to avoid some scrapes and minor cuts, but there are things you can do to decrease the number your child will have and to minimize their severity. Visit your pediatrician for more information on preventive measures and what to do when an injury occurs.

By Clinical Pediatric Associates of North Texas
February 02, 2017
Category: Pediatric Care
Tags: Vision  
Child Vision ImpairmentsAs a parent, you may rely on the results of a school vision screening or the fact that your child doesn’t report any symptoms as an indication he or she does not have a vision problem. However, these are not necessarily reliable ways of determining if a vision problem does exist. Children often will not be aware they are not seeing well. They may think the way they see things is the same way everyone else does, since they do not have anything else to compare it to but their own experiences.
 
In the first few months of life, infants can only see clearly objects that are 8 to 10 inches from their face. It isn’t until 12 to 16 weeks that their eyesight begins to improve, and they start seeing things more clearly from further away. Over the next year, children will develop depth perception, eye-body coordination, eye-hand coordination and the ability to judge distances. It is rare for children to have vision problems at this age.

Detecting Eye and Vision Problems in Children

Most of the time, vision problems are not obvious, and the best way to catch issues early is through vision screenings offered by your pediatrician. Sometimes, though, there are symptoms of eye problems such as infection, cataracts or other issues. Warning signs may include:
  • Eye rubbing
  • Tearing
  • Swelling
  • Redness
  • Pus
  • Crust
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Bulging or jiggly eyes
  • Droopy eyelids
  • White, yellow, or gray-white material in the pupil
If your child has any of these symptoms, or their eyes change in any way, or you are worried about their vision, don’t wait until they are 3-years old to get their first vision test. If you are concerned, it is always better to be on the safe side by visiting your pediatrician to have them checked.